Audience

Audience comes from the latin audire: to hear; nonetheless it is used in film, theatre and performance to describe what might naturally be called the spectators, as it is sight we tend to prioritise in these media.

One or more (typically more) individual(s) experiencing something that is presented to them. Typically, a group of individuals experiencing together, each having their own experience and also sharing a collective experience, at a performance of theatre, music, dance, etc, or the screening of a film. It is also used as a collective noun to refer to the remote and dispersed experiencers of television, ad campaigns etc. It can also be applied to the readership of a book, newspaper etc.

edited 23 September, 2015 by Patricia Austin

Associated Practices

Audience

in Film making

The word audience represents all those attending to some event, with whatever senses, as a collective, a crowd, with the tendency to have collective feelings: the audience. The audience in film is entirely extradiegetic and passive: it is outside what is happening on the screen and cannot in any way influence it.

Stuart Jones

edited 5 October, 2015 by Admin

Audience

in Graphic Design

The audience for a graphic design product is usually clearly defined by the client or, following a period of primary research, by the designer in consultation with the client.
The term ‘audiencing’  refers to the ways in which readers interpret and understand texts. Surveys of audience reading are often based on methods adopted from qualitative social science, such as interviews and ethnographic studies, together with quantitative methods based on statistical analysis.

However, one further model for graphic designers to consider is the reflective critical interpretation of images, which can often include a personal deconstruction of existing work or critical reflection on work being undertaken by the designer himself. Through the analysis of design methods, the designer can become more expert in the range of forms and approaches suitable for a particular context or audience.”

‘Visual Research’- Ian Noble and Russell Bestley

edited 5 October, 2015 by Admin

Audience

in Music

Audience comes from the latin audire: to hear; therefore it is completely appropriate to descibe those attending and listening to a musical performance. Of course it is also used for film, theatre and performance. What the word audience does do is make all those attending to a performance, with whatever senses, a collective, a crowd, with the collective, shared feelings that crowds have. In performance the audience, although usually outside the performance itself (extradiegetic) has an effect on the performance. This is particularly clear in music performances, where the ‘dialogue’ set up between the performers and the audience is a key part of the concert’s energy. The term is also used in a wider, more loose sense, to describe an artiste’s public “my audience”.

Stuart Jones

edited 19 March, 2016 by Patricia Austin

As will be clear from the definition of audience in other practices, it refers to a collective: either a collective that is conscious of its collected self, as in theatre or music, or completely unaware and dispersed, as in television. This makes it a problematic term in narrative environment design, where most often the environment is expected to be experienced on a one-to-one basis by individuals who do not perceive themselves as a collective. Terms from ‘visitor’ through to ‘perticipant’ are in this sense much less problematic. However, in some narrative environments, especially where multi user interaction is present, individual participants can fuse into an active collective. This relates to ‘audience participation’, which is long standing in the theatre, particularly since the 1960s. For example, “Akropolis” directed by Jerzy Grotowski: in it the company of actors (representing concentration camp prisoners) build the structure of a crematorium around the audience while acting out stories from the Bible and Greek mythology. Later, in “The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus” based on the Elizabethan drama by Marlowe, foregoing the use of props altogether, Grotowski let the actors’ bodies represent different objects, establishing an intimate dynamic of relation between actors and spectators by seating audience members as the guests at Faust’s last supper, with the action unfolding on and around the (human) table where they were seated. These kinds of theatrical performances can be viewed as antecedents to contemporary narrative interaction based design.

Stuart Jones

edited 4 September, 2018 by Admin

Audience

in Performance

The word audience ackowledges that all those attending to a performance, with whatever senses, are a collective with collective emotions. In performance the audience, although usually outside the performance itself (extradiegetic) has an effect on the performance. All performers talk about this effect, the way the energy and behaviour of the audience affects their performance, hence “good, bad, lively, dead etc audiences”. Some performances encourage audience participation at various levels, even to the point of bringing the audience as a whole, or members of it, into an intradiegetic position (inside the performance). This kind of high level participation can sometimes be considered a form of co-authorship.

edited 5 October, 2015 by Admin

Audience

in Theatre

The word audience represents all those attending to a performance, with whatever senses, as a collective, implicitly with the shared emotions of a crowd. In theatre the audience, although usually outside the performance itself (extradiegetic) has an effect on the performance. All actors talk about this effect, the way the energy and behaviour of the audience affects their performance, hence “good, bad, lively, dead etc audiences”. Some theatre encourages audience participation to varying levels, bringing the audience as a whole, or members of it, into an intradiegetic position (inside the performance) even to a level that could be considered a form of co-authorship. This has implications for the way we think about narrative environments, where those who might be considered the audience are often inside the environment and therefore may, or may be caused to, experience the narrative intradiegetically.

Stuart Jones

edited 5 October, 2015 by Admin